Maori TV Highlights – Week of Monday 26 May 2008

10 05 2008

THE OPPOSITE SEX – SEX AND EMOTION (INTERNATIONAL DOCO) – Tuesday May 27 at 8.30 PM

A fascinating documentary that exposes the difference between men and women – their bodies, brains, emotions and behaviour – and questions our current beliefs about what is ‘natural’ to each gender. Are men naturally more aggressive than women? Are women really the natural nurturers? Sometimes provocative, at times funny, viewers can expect fresh insight into themselves and their opposite sex – and perhaps a few changes of opinion.

FROM STREET TO SKY (NZ DOCO) – Wednesday May 28 at 8.30 PM

An early member of the Polynesian Panthers, reggae musician, committed Rastafarian and Che Fu’s father – Tigilau Ness has been a key figure in the relationship between Maori and Peoples of the Pacific. One of four people imprisoned for his stand against apartheid and the 1982 Springbok Tour, he’s never shied away from social wrongs, and his vision has helped forge unity in the Polynesian community.

HUNTING AOTEAROA – Thursday May 29 at 9.30 PM

Season premiere! The only New Zealand television show for hunting and shooting enthusiasts is back by popular demand. Take in the spectacular scenery and watch some good keen huntsmen bag some big game, with presenter Howie Morrison Junior.

VODAFONE ONE TRIBE TV – Friday May 30 at 8.00 PM

The players and the personalities behind New Zealand’s only NRL franchise – the Vodafone Warriors. A magazine show that brings the fans closer to their heroes, and follows the guys as they get out into the community – in hospitals, at junior league club special training sessions, and doing their bit for the anti-text bullying campaign.

ARERO (YOUTH) – Saturday May 31 at 5.30 PM

Season premiere! The return of the show that examines the issues surrounding the youth of today. Panelists Otene Hopa, Parearau Black, Faye Peke and Skye Stirling are in the studio. Today’s topic: Haka competitions run through from primary and secondary schools to adult groups. Some say the competitions have hit overkill, and others wouldn’t have it any other way.

KAI ORA (COOKING) – Sunday June 1 at 7.00 PM

Season premiere! Fresh fare, fabulous music and eclectic celebrity guests are the essential ingredients for this show. Anne Thorp hosts the series from her commercial kitchens in Herne Bay and at Pakiri Beach. Celebrate fine dining Maori style, with lots of laughter, and guests who reciprocate her hospitality by singing for their supper.

LET MY WHAKAPAPA SPEAK (SUNDAY FEATURE) – Sunday June 1 at 9.00 PM

This documentary, by renowned director Tainui Stephens, examines the struggles that led to the growth of the kohanga reo movement – and the woman at the forefront of change. An inspiration to many, a thorn in the side to some, Iritana Tawhiwhirangi is a woman whose reputation precedes her as someone unafraid and compelled to speak her mind. She is one of a generation of leaders who emerged in the post-war era, and her influence has ranged across government, broadcasting and tribal issues, and of course, education.





NZ sevens captain DJ Forbes and surfer Daniel Kereopa feature on Code

6 05 2008

New Zealand Sevens skipper DJ Forbes, ace surfer Daniel Kereopa and former Kiwi player and Warriors coach Tony Kemp are special guests on Maori Television’s award-winning sports entertainment show HYUNDAI CODE this Thursday May 8 at 8.30 PM (repeats Sunday May 11 at 4.00 PM).

DJ Forbes has had an incredible run since taking the reins as captain of the NZ Sevens national team in late 2006. Praised for his unbelievably high work rate, he has also proved himself as a special kind of leader, and his team has absolutely blitzed the IRB Sevens 2008 tournament. An amazing winning streak has seen them power through 42 consecutive games unbeaten, and to claim five of the six rounds played so far. That streak ended in the last round in Adelaide, but the team still looks odds on favourites to go all the way. With just two more rounds to play later this month – in London and Scotland – the New Zealanders are currently sitting on 126 points, their nearest rival is South Africa on 92, then Fiji on 74. Forbes checks in with the crew at HYUNDAI CODE before he heads away.

Daniel Kereopa – aka DK – is one of New Zealand’s top surfers, and he’s also Mr Consistent, finishing at the top, or near to it, in all the big contests. He has an impressive string of trophies to his name including numerous longboard events, Maori nationals and ‘Big Wave’ awards – for biggest wave paddled into – and the Open Men’s 2007 title. His positive and determined attitude also makes him an ideal mentor and role model to young people, especially in his home turf, the Raglan-Waikato area. He has presented one of Maori Television’s shows – HYUNDAI HEKE NGARU – which sees him travelling the country to the big surfing events, and imparting his wisdom and experience along the way.

As a player Tony Kemp scaled the heights of international rugby league. As a former coach of this country’s only NRL team, he held the hopes of the league nation in his hands. On the field and on the sidelines, Kemp has proved he’s got what it takes to handle the jandal n the high pressure world of elite sport. Most of Kemp’s career was in the NRL in the late 80s and early 90s, when he played for Newcastle Knights and South Queensland Crushers. As a Kiwi player he racked up some 25 tests to his name. His coaching career began in the England Super League, then continued with the Warriors where he worked his way to head coach in 2004. His sporting inspirations: fellow Northland boy Sid Going and the legendary 1983 Kiwis.

Voted Best Sports Programme at last year’s Air New Zealand Screen Awards, HYUNDAI CODE is an hour-long show – now in its fourth year – and filmed live in front of a studio audience at Maori Television’s Auckland headquarters. Tawera Nikau and Jenny-May Coffin are joined by Warriors’ Wairangi Koopu and the ‘Brofessionals’ – aka Glen Osborne (Oz) and Matua Parkinson (Mutz) – for more news, inside stories and off-camera action with Kiwi sports stars excelling at home and abroad.

Book your ringside seat for hard-case interviews and plenty of laughs with HYUNDAI CODE – screening on Maori Television every Thursday at 8.30 PM (repeats every Sunday at 4.00 PM).





Documentary follows development of Kohanga Reo

5 05 2008

They are the two magic words in the story of how a struggling Maori language was pulled back from the brink of extinction: ‘kohanga reo’.

Now that ground-breaking education movement, and the remarkable woman behind it – Iritana Te Rangi Tawhiwhirangi – is the subject of a fascinating feature-length documentary LET MY WHAKAPAPA SPEAK, to premiere in Maori Television’s Sunday Feature slot, Kiriata Ratapu, on Sunday June 1 at 9.00 PM.

Kohanga reo, or ‘language nest’, is a unique and innovative programme for babies and pre-schoolers, based on a simple but powerful principle: total immersion in Maori language and values. More than 25 years on the movement can be seen as a turning point and cornerstone for Maori, in the fight to revive the language – the heart of any living culture – for future generations.

The impact and influence of kohanga reo is profound. These days it is taken as given that children can grow up and do all their learning – from pre-school to primary and secondary school – entirely in te reo Maori, anchored by that early immersion experience. International groups, inspired by the success of kohanga reo, have used it as a model to create native language nests in their own corners of the world. And many of the original generation of tamariki have come full circle, and are back in the kohanga reo fold with their own young ones.

This documentary, by renowned director Tainui Stephens, examines the struggles that led to the growth of this movement – and the woman at the forefront of change. An inspiration to many, a thorn in the side to some, Tawhiwhirangi is a woman whose reputation precedes her as someone unafraid and compelled to speak her mind. She is one of a generation of leaders who emerged in the post-war era to take the Maori world forward into the future, and her influence has ranged across government, broadcasting and tribal issues, and of course, education.

A trained teacher, in her early days this Ngati Porou woman worked with Sylvia Ashton-Warner at Waiomatatini, an experience she says informed what would later become founding the principles in the kohanga reo movement.

Tainui says that to be in Iritana’s presence is to feel the power of profound love and intelligent conviction: “Iri can be many things in the one meeting. I have watched her be a gentle loving kuia, a cheeky girl, a wise teacher, a shrewd civil servant – and a pocket battleship. She is one of the most extraordinary and capable people I have ever met. The crew and I loved being with her.”

This documentary features in-depth interviews with major figures from Maoridom including politicians Winston Peters and Tariana Turia, and the man within government who drove the change in policy that lead to the establishment of kohanga reo, Kara Puketapu. Educationalists Tamati Reedy and Cathy Dewes, among others, also give interviews.

From the early part of the 20th Century, Maori leaders encouraged their people to use English, in the belief this was the only road to achievement. By the end of the 1970s, the effects of this policy meant several generations were unable to speak their own language. Something had to be done – and it was. This is the incredible story of how the tide was reversed: LET MY WHAKAPAPA SPEAK premieres in Maori Television’s Sunday Feature slot, Kiriata Ratapu, on Sunday June 1 at 9.00 PM.





Ngati Tumatauenga – NZ Army recruit show

5 05 2008

Ngati Tumatauenga NZ Army Recruit Show
Ngati Tumatauenga is the TV show following Maori Recruits through the NZ Army. It is a reality documentary series looking at what it takes to become a member of the NZ Army.

This week some of the recruits get a reality and fitness check as the dreaded army RFL assessment is put to them. They get their first taste of the excitement of live firing. And for one of the recruits could the dream of joining the NZ Defence Force be almost over.

It airs on Maori TV 9:00pm Mondays.
Find out more on the Ngati Tumatauenga website.





Maori TV Highlights – Week of Monday 19 May 2008

5 05 2008

AFGHANISTAN THE HEROIN CONNECTION (INTERNATIONAL DOCO) – Tuesday May 20 at 8.30 PM

Over eighty-five percent of the heroin consumed in Europe comes from Afghanistan, where, despite the declarations of Western officials, production has exploded. Shot under perilous conditions, often with a hidden camera, this documentary tracks the journey of the heroin, from poppy fields to the veins of its users.

TOA: TOA O AOTEAROA – Thursday May 22 at 9.30 PM

Series finale. Unique reality series where contestants use traditional Maori weaponry to battle it out and find out who deserves to be called the best of the best. Tonight: Only one warrior will take away the title of champion – and the cash prize of $10,000.

VODAFONE ONE TRIBE TV – Friday 23 May at 8.00 PM

New! The players and the personalities behind New Zealand’s only NRL franchise – the Vodafone Warriors. A magazine show that brings the fans closer to their heroes, and follows the guys as they get out into the community – in hospitals, at junior league club special training, and doing their bit for the anti-text bullying campaign.

WHARE TAPERE – Sunday 25 May at 5.00 PM

New! Kapa haka is flourishing in this country. It also has a vital role to play in the revitalisation of te reo and tikanga Maori. Tamati Waaka leads studio discussion to look at the elements that inspire such passion amongst performers and fans alike.

THE NEW MIGRATION – Sunday 25 May at 8.00 PM

New series! It’s one of the biggest decisions many Maori will ever make: to leave behind settled and successful city lives to return to their roots. This subject is explored through six individuals who have made the decision to up-sticks and return to their tribal areas. The $64,000 question: have they made the right choice?

KAIHOE WAHINE – Sunday 25 May at 8.30 PM

Series premiere! Sporting reality show that follows four teams of women paddlers as they count down to compete at the 2008 National Waka Ama Championships.

BASTION POINT 30TH COMMEMORATIVE ANNIVERSARY – Sunday 25 May from 9.00 PM – 11.00 PM

BASTION POINT DAY 507 – At 9.00 PM

When the Government of the day announced plans to commit Bastion Point to development, tangata whenua set up an occupied protest on the land. This seminal documentary, by Merita Mita, captures the moments on Day 507 of that occupation – May 25, 1978 – when the army was sent in to remove the protesters.

NATIVE AFFAIRS SPECIAL – At 9.25 PM

Thirty years on from events at Bastion Point, Julian Wilcox and the team mark this significant milestone in Maori history. Prominent New Zealanders and grassroots people involved in events are in the studio to look back, discuss and evaluate the importance of the occupation.

THE UNTOLD STORY – At 10.10 PM

In 1999, another team of documentary makers pick up the thread of the story where Merata Mita’s piece – Bastion Point Day 507 – left off.





Publication launched for working with Māori in Film and Television

2 05 2008

This pioneering text explores the challenges and benefits of making film and television according to Maori ethical protocol. —Urutahi Koataata Māori : Working with Māori in Film & Television120 pp, $25.00).
Film and television make a significant contribution to New Zealand’s economy and export earnings, as well as being a very powerful media through which we express our national identity and assert our unique brand.

Ngā Aho Whakaari has initiated this publication to alleviate genuine concern and to inform and assist the local film and television production community, visiting internationals, broadcasters, funding bodies and educational institutes on how to work more effectively with Māori content and Māori communities.

Urutahi Koataata Māori – Working with Māori in Film & Television offers solutions to the complex and difficult problems that arise when the treasures of Māori enter the film & television world which seeks to reproduce and disseminate them.
‘I believe — passionately, as it happens — that it is possible to share with other peoples our own works and be given opportunities to enjoy their works in return. We cannot afford to be light-headed about it though, for experience teaches us that, when moving as artists into the Indigenous world, we may unwittingly be the occasion of significant hurt. With a little respect and understanding, we can avoid that.’ – Barry Barclay

Urutahi Koataata Māori: Working with Māori in Film & Television is a timely and valuable resource that is intended to provide a workable framework that can be applied to all genres of film and television and establish practices that can be relied upon as the industry standard for working with Māori.
Urutahi Koaatata: Maori Protocol for Film & Television by Ngā Aho Whakaari.

Published by Renee Mark, with assistance from The NZ Film Commission and Te Puni Kokiri
PB; 120p; $25.00





www.maoritelevision.com website adding value

29 04 2008

The www.maoritelevision.com Maori television website is beginning to add extra value to visitors with promotional video clips now playing and a full daily guide of both Maori TV and Te Reo TV.

They have also launched a specific channel for Te Reo TV

We look forward to more developments in the future.